5 Things To Do After Flame Or Water Cremation

5 Things To Do After Flame Or Water Cremation

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Many people have left instructions with loved ones to scatter their remains after death. I regret to inform you, the Disney idea is well planned for by park officials and it just is not going to happen, Mom. This is so frowned upon that the park has created a code “HEPA” to call upon someone with an ultra-fine vacuum to suck up your scattering and usher you into a Disney trash receptacle. 

So, perhaps returning your loved one’s remains to a favorite ranchland stream or a favorite tropical beach would designate a special kind of closure to the ending chapter of their extraordinary life. Here are some of my favorite places to scatter ashes to inspire you:

1. Water Scattering 

If your beloved requested a boat lit by fire for their final chapter, I can tell you to have someone do the cremation FIRST, then put the ashes on a boat to set adrift and light ablaze.  Then we don’t have limbs washing ashore half charred. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, you may opt to scatter cremated remains at sea, so long as you’re at least three miles off-shore and you report the burial in writing to the EPA within 30 days of the ceremony. For the nature lover in your life, the scattering of remains in a local stream, lake or pond is another viable option. While funeral laws vary locally, some states, such as Texas, have pretty lenient laws in regard to scattering. In Texas, grieving family members have free rein to scatter cremated remains in waterways.

2. Scattered across the Land(s) 

Many families tell me they have a list of destinations for different portions of their loved one’s cremated remains. Places they grew up, locations that held sweet memories or deep meanings, other people’s graves… My dear friend Gary is on all 7 continents. Scattering cremated remains on private property are at the sole discretion of the property owner, and as long as you’ve asked for and received permission, you’re free to scatter off scenic overlooks or along favorite mountain trails. Yes, you can KIND OF become a tree, but read our additional blog post about that.

3. Become a Habitat  

After sunset, new life begins… your loved one can become a memorial reef ball habitat for coral and sea life, forever enhancing coral generation, increasing marine biomass, and providing an eco-friendly alternative to traditional burial or sitting in a box in the closet. Dedicate your loved one’s cremated remains as an undersea memorial! The company Memorial Reefs International will help you preserve the memory of your loved one as a living treasure for generations to come.

4. Cremation Jewelry 

Cremated remains can be a part of your daily wardrobe, or when you need to have someone you loved close.  The ash can be filled into precious metal jewelry pieces from rings to pendants. There are many options such as necklaces, rings, and bracelets. There is even a company local to Austin called Eterneva, that will take the carbon of your loved one’s flame or water cremated remains and over 9 months time, create a rough diamond cut to the style you prefer in the color of your desires. Ask us how to become bling!

5. Paintings, Pottery, and Paperweights  

Remember getting together with the gals, a bottle or 4 of wine, and meeting at a painting class in a strip center? Ah, the memories, Picasso and Pinot. Cremated remains can be incorporated into paintings, pottery clay, and even introduced into hot glass orbs, swirling with colors and glints of glitter. You can hire any number of talented artists to create something personal to your family, or undertake the task yourself.

Do you have cremation scattering questions or need a cremation? Contact us today!

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