The Most Important Things to Know About the Cost of Cremation in Texas

cost of cremation in texas
Cremation costs can vary around the U.S., but here’s what to know about the cost of cremation in Texas and what to expect when cremating a loved one.

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An estimated 44% of Americans plan to be cremated when they die, officially overtaking traditional burial as the most popular end-of-life preference. 

One reason for its soaring popularity is that cremation tends to a less expensive option compared to a traditional burial. But what is the actual cost of cremation in Texas? And how do you know if it’s the right choice for you? We’re here to help. 

Keep reading to learn more about the average cost of cremation in Texas, the different factors that affect the cost, and the types of cremation services available to you. 

What Is the Average Cost of Cremation in Texas?

The short answer is that it depends. In the state of Texas, you can expect to spend anywhere between $1,000 and $3,000 on cremation services, generally speaking. 

Here at Green Cremation Texas, we proudly offer affordable cremation services starting from $945 so you can choose the best option for your body, at the right price. 

What Affects the Overall Cost of Cremation?

As you can see, the average cost of cremation can vary by hundreds or thousands of dollars. That’s because there are multiple factors that go into the overall cost. The good news is that you have some control over some of these factors, so you can help determine the final cost of your cremation services. 

Here’s a closer look at what determines the cost of a cremation. 

Service Provider

Unsurprisingly, the company you choose to perform the cremation is one of the biggest factors in determining how much the final costs will be. Make sure you understand exactly what service providers include in their packages and what comes at an additional cost.

If you’re not careful, the costs can add up quickly, leaving you with a much higher cremation bill than you were anticipating. Do some research before deciding which service provider to use. Once you do, we think you’ll agree that our team is the best fit for your needs. 

Transportation of the Body

When someone passes away, their body must be moved to a new location for cremation. These transportation fees affect the overall cost of cremation. These fees might vary depending on the distance required to travel, which is why most people tend to use a local service provider.

Preparation of the Body

Since a person isn’t cremated immediately after they pass away, the cost also covers the storage and preparation of the body before the cremation takes place. In Texas, specifically, the law prohibits cremation within the first 48 hours after death. It could be delayed longer if the coroner needs more time to determine the cause of death. 

Additionally, some families wish to hold a public viewing of the body prior to cremation, which can delay the cremation process as well. The total costs of these services cover the storage of the body during this period, as well as the required preparation before cremation. 

Cremation Process

Once the body is ready to be cremated, the process can begin. The costs vary depending on the type of cremation you choose, which we’ll talk more about in a bit. The price of the actual cremation process typically doesn’t vary much, unless there are specific considerations to take into account about the deceased. 

Placement of Remains

Once the body has been cremated, you’ll need to think about what to do with the remains. These days, there are creative options for memorializing the ashes of a loved one, but they come with a variety of price tags. 

For example, urns can vary by hundreds of dollars. If you plan to purchase an urn, that will affect your costs much more than choosing to scatter the ashes instead. Fortunately, you can control this aspect of the cremation process, choosing how much you’d like to spend. 

Memorial Service

While a formal memorial service is more often associated with a typical burial, you can still choose to hold one for a cremated loved one. Unless you’re planning to hold the service at home or a free venue, you’ll want to budget for the memorial service when planning for cremation costs. 

Here at Green Cremation Texas, we offer memorial and chapel services to our customers, so you can gather together to remember and honor those who have passed. This can be an important part of the healing process when grieving a loved one.

What Are the Different Types of Cremation?

Now that you know more about the factors that affect the cost of a cremation, it’s important to have an understanding of the different types of cremation services available to you. 

We offer two methods of green cremation: flame and water.

Flame Cremation

Also known as traditional cremation, this is a flame-based method designed to reduce the environmental impact of cremation. We use an environmentally friendly crematorium, and ensure that no plastics are incinerated during the cremation process. 

Water Cremation

Quickly emerging as the most environmentally friendly method of cremation, this process uses alkaline hydrolysis to replicate the naturally occurring decomposition process. 

Currently, water cremation is not legal in Texas, so we’ve partnered with a water cremation provider in Missouri to offer this service to our clients. Just like a flame cremation, you’ll still receive the ashes of your loved one following a water cremation. 

Preparing for What’s to Come

After reading through this article on the cost of cremation in Texas, we hope you feel more equipped to decide if cremation is right for you or your loved one. We know that making end-of-life decisions isn’t easy, and we’re here to help guide you through it. 

Please don’t hesitate to contact us to learn more about our environmentally friendly cremation services and to get pricing quotes for the services you want. We proudly serve communities throughout Texas and are here to help you through this difficult time.

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