Category: Things to Consider

Cremation vs Burial: How to Decide Between the Two
Things to Consider

Cremation vs Burial: How to Decide Between the Two

About 57 million people die every year. However, there are many people who fail to make a plan beforehand. By making certain decisions for yourself now, you can take the burden off a loved one’s shoulders in the future. As you begin making your funeral arrangements, you’ll have to decide between cremation vs burial. How do you choose between the two? We’re here to help. Here’s everything you need to know about cremation versus burial. By learning about both, you can make an informed decision for yourself. Discover how to choose between cremation and burial with this helpful guide!  The Process First, let’s take a look at your options. Cremation will reduce your body into remains within a few hours. Traditional burial, on the other hand, requires a slow, natural decomposition process. One way to choose cremation vs burial is to consider the process itself. Are you more comfortable decomposing naturally? Some people view cremation as rushing the process while others think it denotes reverence.  If you decide on cremation, you’ll need to have the body transported to the crematorium. Then, you’ll need to take care of the proper paperwork, which can include the death certificate and transit permits. Some states will require you to hire a funeral director to complete these steps. It’s best to look into your state’s requirements beforehand.  With a burial, on the other hand, the process takes a little longer. First, you’ll need to have the body transported to the funeral home. The burial itself can involve

I want to be a tree
Things to Consider

I Want To Be A Tree

Every funeral director has heard this phrase uttered from a future client at least once in the last year. Facebook is filled with memes about Haunted Forests and tree urns. There’s just one little problem. Did you know that cremated remains truly cannot nourish or grow a tree? During the flame cremation process, all organic material is destroyed. What is left is not ash but in fact, charred bone, which is then pulverized into a sand or kitty litter size consistency. This material is not suitable to sustain or promote new life AT ALL. The tree urns you see claim to bring forth new life are possibly a waste of money. One product that I trust is called Biotree. The Biotree Urn is made using natural plant fibers and materials that aid in fertilizing the surrounding soil. The cremated remains are encased within the urn, not mixed into the soil, thus lowering the pH levels of the cremated remains, and creating a suitable environment for a tree to grow. Another eco bonus is Biotree takes great care in selecting tree species that are harmonious to your local environment, complementing the unique ecosystem that surrounds them, and creating a living tribute for those who now rest at their roots. A certificate is provided with each Biotree Urn, which families can redeem to receive their memorial tree sapling. The retail price for a Biotree Urn is $300. Let us know if you would like more information or to purchase a Biotree Urn.

5 Things To Do After Flame Or Water Cremation
Things to Consider

5 Things To Do After Flame Or Water Cremation

Many people have left instructions with loved ones to scatter their remains after death. I regret to inform you, the Disney idea is well planned for by park officials and it just is not going to happen, Mom. This is so frowned upon that the park has created a code “HEPA” to call upon someone with an ultra-fine vacuum to suck up your scattering and usher you into a Disney trash receptacle.  So, perhaps returning your loved one’s remains to a favorite ranchland stream or a favorite tropical beach would designate a special kind of closure to the ending chapter of their extraordinary life. Here are some of my favorite places to scatter ashes to inspire you: 1. Water Scattering  If your beloved requested a boat lit by fire for their final chapter, I can tell you to have someone do the cremation FIRST, then put the ashes on a boat to set adrift and light ablaze.  Then we don’t have limbs washing ashore half charred. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, you may opt to scatter cremated remains at sea, so long as you’re at least three miles off-shore and you report the burial in writing to the EPA within 30 days of the ceremony. For the nature lover in your life, the scattering of remains in a local stream, lake or pond is another viable option. While funeral laws vary locally, some states, such as Texas, have pretty lenient laws in regard to scattering. In Texas, grieving family