Feeling Present When You Have to Mourn From a Distance

Feeling Present When You Have to Mourn From a Distance
Mourning from a distance is a completely new concept. In this post, we’re sharing some of our best advice on how to feel present when you have to mourn from a distance.

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The COVID-19 pandemic has changed a lot of things, but one of the most unexpected changes has been how we are grieving the loss of loved ones. Since the pandemic began, funerals and memorials as we know them haven’t been possible in many places. We’ve been forced to mourn from a distance without a memorial service to bring people together for our own safety.

The way our direct cremation services are provided hasn’t changed much in recent months, but mourning from a distance is a completely new concept for many of our clients. In this post, we’re sharing some of our best advice on how to feel present when you have to mourn from a distance.

Ways to Mourn on Your Own While Still Staying Connected

A once-in-a-lifetime pandemic isn’t the only thing that keeps people from mourning with loved ones. Financial situations, illness and travel are just a few other reasons why people have to mourn from a distance after a death. It’s not easy to do, but there are ways to feel more connected when you have to grieve alone. 

Leverage Technology to Feel Closer

Not long ago there wasn’t an easy way to see people that didn’t live in the same town as you. Today in a matter of seconds you can be video chatting with anyone anywhere in the world with a device you keep in your pocket all the time. 

It’s not the same as being there in person by any means, but at least you can see those familiar faces as you talk about what you’re going through. One of the family members can also host a virtual memorial so you can come together as a group. 

If there is going to be a memorial service and you aren’t able to make it find time to video chat with whoever is hosting the memorial. It’s best to do this after the memorial when they don’t have so many other things that need to be done.

Find a Way to Participate From Afar

Memorials and funerals are times when family and friends come together to honor a loved one. Often it’s a group effort that involves loved ones and professionals.

With so many things that can be done for a memorial there are ways to participate no matter where you are. You can be thousands of miles away and still order flowers or create a photo slideshow for the memorial service. You can also write a eulogy for another friend or family member to read aloud during the service.

Plan a Trip to Visit Loved Ones

After the memorial many people go about their daily life, but for anyone who was close to the deceased daily life is not the same. Visiting them a few weeks or months later when you are able to travel could be a welcome distraction. It will also give you a chance to get closure or to have a heartfelt conversation about your loss. 

Get Help as Soon as You Need It

If you are experiencing symptoms of depression or having difficulty coping with the loss of a loved one there are resources just a call or click away. 

A few virtual counseling services launched before the pandemic, and they have seen a dramatic increase in people needing their assistance. Not only is it safer during pandemic conditions, it’s also there for you when you need it most.

You can also use the Crisis Text Line anytime. Text ‘home’ to 741741 to connect with a counselor.

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