Water Cremation is the most environmentally friendly method of cremation available.

Water cremation, also known as aquamation, uses liquid (95% water, 5% alkali solution), elevated heat, and water to break the chemical bonds that hold the body’s proteins together. This process directly replicates the effect of naturally occurring decomposition of traditional earthen burials.

At the end of this process, the body has been returned to its constituent elements – amino acids, peptides, sugars and salts – suspended in the water. Similar to flame-based cremation, there is no DNA to link back to the person and the only solid remains are the bones, which are then pulverized and returned to the family as remains.

Why Water Cremation?

Introduced to the public in 2011, Water Cremation is the most environmentally friendly method of cremation available. It offers a number of environmental advantages over traditional burial or flame-based cremation services.

Overall, the end-to-end process uses 90% less energy than traditional flame cremation.

Fewer harmful toxins are released into the atmosphere. Medical implants are removed after cremation (you can request to have these returned to you, or medically recycled), ensuring the Mercury they contain is never released into the air.

While flame cremation produces carbon dioxide equivalent to a 1,000 mile car ride, water cremation does not release any airborne toxins.

Water usage is low. The process only requires 300 gallons of water — the equivalent of just three days worth of water consumption for an average person.

Finally, increased safety standards. The lack of a flame is safer both for the operator and community.

This translates into decreased environmental and human impact. As a result, an increasing number of people are choosing water cremation as an alternative to burial and flame-based cremation services.

Water Cremation - $2285

Lake Travis

Flame Cremation

The most environmentally friendly flame-based cremation process possible. For people uncomfortable with Water Cremation, but still looking to reduce their environmental footprint in death, we

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